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Sleater-Kinney, Soccer Mommy, R.E.M., Wet Leg, and More Join Abortion Access Benefit Compilation

Sleater-Kinney, Soccer Mommy, R.E.M., Cat Power, Fleet Foxes, Wet Leg, Mac DeMarco, and dozens more have shared exclusive tracks for Good Music to Ensure Safe Abortion Access to All. The Bandcamp-exclusive compilation benefits nonprofits working to provide abortion access. It will be available to purchase for only 24 hours on this Friday, on October 7, which is also a Bandcamp Friday. Check out the full list of participating artists and Kim Gordon’s cover art below. 

The compilation features previously unreleased recordings that include new songs, covers, remixes, live versions, and demos. Net proceeds will benefit the Brigid Alliance (a referral-based service that provides travel, food, lodging, childcare, and other logistical support for people seeking abortions) and Noise for Now, which works with Abortion Care Network to support independent abortion clinics.

The full list of contributing artists is as follows: Amanda Shires and Jason Isbell, Andrew Bird, Animal Collective, Annie DiRusso, Bob Weir & Wolf Bros, Bully, Caroline Spence, Erin Rae, Michaela Anne, Tristen, Cat Power, Charlie Hickey, Daniel Rossen, David Byrne and Devo, Death Cab for Cutie, Dirty Projectors, Disq, Emma Bradley, Fleet Foxes, Foals, Gia Margaret, Grouplove, Hand Habits, Jayla Kai, Kills Birds, King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard, Mac DeMarco, Mary Lattimore, Maya Hawke, My Morning Jacket, the Neverly Boys, Overcoats, Pearl Jam, Pluralone, PUP, R.E.M., She & Him, Silversun Pickups, Sleater-Kinney, Soccer Mommy, Squirrel Flower, STS9, Sunflower Bean, Taylor Goldsmith of Dawes, Tegan and Sara, Tenacious D, Thao & the Get Down Stay Down, The Album Leaf, the Regrettes, Tune-Yards, Ty Segall, Water From Your Eyes, and Wet Leg.

Good Music to Ensure Safe Abortion Access to All, artwork by Kim Gordon


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Every Song in the Bros Soundtrack

Warning: Contains spoilers for Bros.


The LGBTQ+ rom-com starring Billy Eichner, Bros has a soundtrack that is full of both hilarious and poignant music. Bros follows a cynical podcaster working on opening an LGBTQ+ history museum in NYC, Bobby, who falls for an athletic, lawyer, who doesn’t want to be tied down, Aaron. From upbeat club music, to jazzy ballads, to touching original work, the Bros soundtrack perfectly underscores the love story.

SCREENRANT VIDEO OF THE DAY

The first LGBTQ+ romantic comedy from a major studio (Universal Studios), the Bros soundtrack includes the work of many queer artists. For example, Orville Peck, Jake Wesley Rogers, and Joan Armatrading are all LGBTQ+ musicians who are featured in the soundtrack. Additionally, artists who have become a huge part of LGBTQ+ community spaces, such as Kylie Minogue and Mariah Carey, are featured throughout the Bros soundtrack.

RELATED: Was Abraham Lincoln Gay Or Bi? Why Bros Suggests He Was

Additionally, Bros features an original song written by Billy Eichner and Marc Shaiman and performed by Eichner himself: “Love is Not Love.” The tune is a touching song about Bobby’s struggles with commitment and the unique nature of queer relationships, highlighting a distance from the idea that cultures must be homogenous, additionally showcased through the diverse cast of Bros. Here’s every song in the Bros soundtrack, and when each plays in the movie.

“Love Is Here To Stay” by Nat King Cole – As Bobby explains that he likes to take a walk around the city after a grinder hook-up, this jazzy tune plays while he does so.

“We All Move Together (Kevin Saunderson X Latroit Remix)” – Inner City, Idris Elba, Kevin Saunderson, & Latroit – This song plays in the background of Bros while Bobby and his friend, Henry, gossip in a nightclub.

“Heartbreaker/If You Should Ever Be Lonely (Junior’s Heartbreaker Club Mix)” by Mariah Carey – The Mariah Carey remix plays when Bobby first meets Aaron in the Bros movie. Aaron says he doesn’t recognize the song and prefers country music like Garth Brooks.

“Dreaming With A Broken Heart” by John Mayer – At the end of Bobby and Aaron’s first date, Aaron receives an invitation to an intimate night with a married couple. He invites Bobby, and the John Mayer song joins the Bros soundtrack during the awkward sexual encounter.

“When I Fall In Love” by Nat King Cole – This song plays over an intimate scene between Bobby and Aaron.

“She’s Like The Wind” by Patrick Swayze feat. Wendy Fraser – While visiting Provincetown, Aaron overhears Bobby singing along to “She’s Like The Wind” from Dirty Dancing in the shower, and he remarks that Bobby has a beautiful singing voice.

Love and Affection by Joan Armatrading – On a beach in Provincetown, Bobby opens up about his lifelong struggles as a gay man. Bobby and Aaron then dance together next to the sunset as the song by Joan Armatrading plays.

Santa Baby (written by Joan Javits, Anthony Springer, Phillip Springer) – Before Aaron and Bobby decide to be a monogamous couple, “Santa Baby” plays over a comical sex scene between them and two other men and Bobby ends up feeling uncomfortable with the situation.

“I’m Flying” – (written by Mark Charlap & Carolyn Leigh) – While Aaron’s family is visiting New York in Bros, Bobby takes them to a restaurant with singing waiters. One of the songs they sing is “I’m Flying.”

“We Go Together” (written by Warren Casey & Jim Jacobs) – This is another song sung by the singing waiters, made especially awkward as it follows an argument between Aaron’s mother and Bobby about teaching queer history to children.

“The People” by 1991 – After Bobby and Aaron have broken up following the argument between Bobby and Aaron’s mother, this song by 1991 is playing in a club when they run into each other again for the first time.

“Turn To Hate” by Orville Peck – After Bobby seemingly ends things with Aaron forever, Aaron decides to pursue his dream of being a chocolatier, something Bobby always encouraged him to do. This Bros song plays over a montage of him learning to make chocolate and opening his own chocolate shop.

Alive (Millenium Funk Mix) by Kevin Aviance – “Alive” plays during the opening of the LGBTQ+ museum.

“Love Is Not Love” (written Billy Eichner & Marc Shaiman) – This is Bobby’s original song which he wrote for Aaron while they were broken up. He sings “Love Is Not Love” to him when Aaron shows up to the museum opening. The title of the song references something Bobby says on his podcast in the beginning moments of the film, noting that LGBTQ+ romance and relationships are not the same as cishet relationships, and that’s okay. Bobby even wrote it in the style of Garth Brooks, because it’s Aaron’s favorite.

“Everybody’s Free (To Feel Good)” by Kylie Minogue – As Bobby and Aaron reconcile, they dance to the Kylie Minogue hit along with their other friends at the museum opening.

“Hindsight” by Jake Wesley Rogers – “Hindsight” plays during the Bros ending credits after the audience sees a scene set three months later as Aaron’s mother takes her 2nd-grade class to the LGBTQ+ museum and Bobby and Aaron are still happily together.

Next: Every Cameo In Bros Explained & What They Mean


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Music schools founded on the Western classical model face special challenges : News Center




October 5, 2022



Crystal Sellers Battle with her arms crossed in the Eastman School of Music's Miller Center.Crystal Sellers Battle started in July as the inaugural associate dean of equity and inclusion at the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music. (University of Rochester photo / J. Adam Fenster)


Crystal Sellers Battle articulates a path toward long-term cultural change at the Eastman School of Music.

Crystal Sellers Battle began her musical journey in church, singing gospel as a youth with her father and siblings. But when she entered college to study voice, “I went into my very first voice lesson and was told by my teacher that I had to choose between singing gospel music or singing classical music,” she says.

About Crystal Sellers Battle

Associate dean of equity and inclusion
Professor of music leadership
Director, George Walker Center for Equity and Inclusion in Music

Born and raised in Columbus, Ohio, Crystal Sellers Battle earned a bachelor of music degree from Bowling Green State University; a master of music from Chicago College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University; a postgraduate diploma from Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, UK; and a doctor of musical arts in vocal performance, with a specialization in singing health, from The Ohio State University.

Before coming to the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music in July 2022, Sellers Battle served as the dean of equity, diversity, and inclusion and chief diversity officer at Juniata College in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. From 2009 to 2021, she was a professor of voice at Bluffton University, serving as chair of the music department from 2017 until her departure. She is also the cofounder of DIEMA (Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity in Musical Arts) Consulting Group, LLC.

Classical vocal training has been honed over centuries to protect the health and viability of the vocal cords. Thus, the teacher reasoned, gospel singing could limit Sellers Battle’s prospects for a long and successful career—as a classical singer. Later, as a doctoral student at Ohio State, Sellers Battle found a mentor who supported her aspirations, and she was able to make a major contribution toward advancing the study of gospel music through her dissertation, I Sing Because I’m Free: Developing a Systematic Vocal Pedagogy for the Modern Gospel Singer.

But Sellers Battle, who started in July as the inaugural associate dean of equity and inclusion at the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music, also knew that something unspoken was at play in the efforts of teachers to steer her away from gospel.

The world of music—a practice and an art form believed to be universal among cultures and societies and with ancient roots—is vast. Yet the doorway into schools of music in the United States has been narrow. Despite the rich musical traditions indigenous to this country—Mississippi Delta blues, bluegrass and Appalachian folk, the musics of Native Americans, jazz—university-level American schools of music proliferated around the turn of the last century to teach and disseminate Western classical music. And to do so was considered a means of cultural elevation.

That historical legacy places a unique burden on schools of music, including Eastman, striving to cultivate a more inclusive learning environment. Although Eastman and its elite peers have long since begun to diversify faculty and curricula, the remnants of that exclusionary past remain entrenched.

In June 2020—deep into the COVID-19 pandemic and in the cataclysmic aftermath of the killing of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, by Minneapolis police officers—Jamal Rossi, the Joan and Martin Messinger Dean of the Eastman School, announced the formation of the Eastman Action Commission for Racial Justice. The mission of the 20-person group composed of students, faculty, staff, and alumni was to recommend “actionable, achievable, measurable, and sustainable” steps to accelerate the school’s work toward achieving a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive community. Working on a tight timeframe, the commission conducted surveys of alumni, students, and faculty, and released a 175-page report the following fall.

The opening lines of the report, which Rossi called “powerful and comprehensive,” read: “The Commission asserts that diversity, equity and inclusion at Eastman have failed to reach the level of highest priority at the School, noting that there has been little change in this regard since 1921.”

There has been only one full-time Black faculty member in the history of the school’s jazz program, for example, and only for a period of two years, in the 1990s. Meanwhile, “many Black alumni, while acknowledging the excellent education they received, cite harrowing and tragic experiences while students at the School,” the commission noted.

The position Sellers Battle now occupies, as well as the George Walker Center for Equity and Inclusion in Music, which she directs, are outgrowths of the commission’s work.


Q&A with Crystal Sellers Battle


The phrase “diversity, equity, and inclusion” has become pretty ubiquitous in recent years in higher education and in workplaces generally. What do each of these words mean to you? 

Sellers Battle: Diversity comes from our mere existence. We all came from different places. We were raised differently. We have different sexual preferences and identities. We have different socioeconomic statuses and backgrounds. We all have different stories related to our upbringing.

I don’t actually like to use the word diversity, because it’s not something we need to work toward. What we do need to work toward is equity and inclusion.

Equity is about everyone having the necessary resources for a successful outcome. I use this example: all full-ride scholarships are not created equal. A student who gets a full ride who came here from a low-income household has a very different experience than someone on a full ride whose parents are doctors. When it comes time to buy a tuxedo or a concert dress, the needs of those two students might not be the same. And to provide additional resources for one, in this case, does not take away from the other.

And I say that inclusion is about the eradication of compartments. For example, I have several identities and not just one. I’m Black, I’m female, I’m a mom, I’m married, I’m straight, I was born Christian, I grew up in a two-parent household, and I was a first-generation college student. You probably have several identities yourself. And what we’ve tended to do is to decide that because someone has a different identity than ours—in any single dimension—we’re going to put them in a compartment over somewhere in the corner. An inclusive environment is one where we’re all in the same container but there are no walls.


Based on your own experiences and knowledge of the history of American music schools, you’ve pointed out that music schools have some unique challenges in fostering inclusion. What are those?

Sellers Battle: What is really challenging in the very nature of the study of music and a higher education process is that it was built on the idea that one form of music, and one which makes up a very small portion of the world’s musics, is superior to any other. Based on that assumption, schools adopted one set of rules, and those were considered the only set of rules.

The assumption of Western classical music’s superiority is very deeply rooted, and it’s interesting how that came to be. Initially most of what is thought of as classical music was created either for church services or for social gatherings in people’s homes. Art song was written to be sung in people’s homes in liederabend—nights where people gathered to sing together. So there were popular and practical reasons for the creation of this music.

But then there became the study of it, coinciding with the rise of the modern research university. And with the study of the music came the theorizing about it. And that theorizing turns what might have once been a popular art form into a high-level art form. I would say that you could probably have theorized West African music, too. It’s just that it wasn’t done.

I think we, meaning music schools in general, have made progress in accepting everyone’s various identities as a person. But then we get to the study of music and eliminate their identities as musicians. For a lot of us, especially those of us who are African American, our entrée into music was not through the classical arena.


What are your top priorities as Eastman’s first designated leader for equity and inclusion?

Sellers Battle: Priority one is identifying what equity and inclusion mean for this institution. The definitions I offered are my general definitions, but the definitions are different for every institution based on priorities and historical contexts.

Priority number two is to make the George Walker Center into a space for students. There’s a belief here that “eat, sleep, music” is how you operate—and students tend to skip the sleep part. I have a rule: we’re not going to practice in this space; we’re going to use it to unwind and rejuvenate. It’s also going to address the needs of affinity groups. So there may be nights when we’re really focused on LGBTQ+ energies, or when our Black Students Union is reserving the space for an affinity moment. But I’m also trying to convey that the George Walker Center is a space for all. And in being a space for all, it’s going to bring some people together who wouldn’t necessarily have been together otherwise.

My third priority is to engage in conversations with faculty, staff, and students to help me see where faculty, staff, and students see themselves in this process. I want to make sure that we’re all engaged in thinking about what the process for change looks like.


Have you set longer-term goals?

Sellers Battle: I have a few ideas based on the commission report and other observations. We’re probably going to be looking at curricular restructuring but doing it in small segments rather than as a major overhaul. You cannot do an about-face without proper planning and time, or people are going to get hurt.


Leading a cultural shift seems like an extraordinarily complicated and challenging job. What are your thoughts on how to go about it?

Sellers Battle: Sometimes it’s really difficult to abandon tradition. A lot of people also think that the only way to enter into conversations about equity and inclusion is through the topic of race. It’s not. Let’s go back to my description of an inclusive space as a single container without walls. Sometimes I also use the analogy of a cruise ship. We’re all on the same ship, but there are many entryways.

My belief is that if you are not comfortable coming into this conversation through the door of race, then let’s have you enter through another door, which may be about age, or another which may be about religion, or gender, or a particular interest—whatever it is that’s going to get you into the space. Then we can begin the conversation.

Equity and inclusion is about much more than race. Let’s talk about the challenges of socioeconomic status, or religious identity, and all of these other dimensions to our identities. And then people who are not comfortable entering through the door of race are going to find out that there are some similarities between the challenges they face that are based on a particular aspect of their identity and the challenges faced by people that stem from race.

We’re not going to be able to eradicate institutionalized racism, or any other kind of structural inequity, in a day. But we can till the soil to break some of it up. And that takes work. A lot of work. But that doesn’t mean that it’s impossible work.


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Elections to be held in J-K after voters’ list compilation, says Amit Shah

Baramulla (Jammu and Kashmir) [India], October 5 (ANI): In a major announcement, Union Home Minister Amit Shah on Wednesday said that the elections will be held in Jammu and Kashmir will “full transparency” as soon as the work of compiling the voters’ list is completed.

Shah said that manner in which delimitation has been done in the region, representatives of the people’s choice will be elected.

“As soon as the work of compiling the voters’ list is completed, elections will be held in JK with full transparency. Earlier the delimitation was done in such a way that only the representatives from the three families would be elected, no matter what you do. The delimitation that Election Commission has done, your own representatives will win the elections and rule,” Shah said while addressing a rally in Baramulla on the last day of his three-day visit to J-K.

Assembly polls to elect the government in the Union Territory are due since the abrogation of Articles 370 and 35A on August 5, 2019. The Centre while abrogating the special status of the region, had said that the status of state will be given to Jammu and Kashmir at the appropriate time and the elections will be held after delimitation.

The orders of the Delimitation Commission were effective from May 20 with the Centre choosing the day for the move using powers of the Jammu and Kashmir Reorganisation Act, 2019.

As per the final Delimitation Order, out of the 90 Assembly Constituencies (ACs) in Jammu and Kashmir, 43 will be part of the Jammu region and 47 for the Kashmir region keeping in view the provisions of Section 9(1)(a) of the Delimitation Act, 2002 and Section 60(2)(b) of JammuKashmir Reorganization Act, 2019.

The Delimitation Commission was entrusted with the work of delimiting the Assembly and Parliamentary Constituencies in the UT of Jammu and Kashmir on the basis of the 2011 Census and in accordance with the provisions of Part-V of the Jammu and Kashmir Reorganisation Act, 2019 (34 of 2019) and the provisions of Delimitation Act, 2002(33 of 2002).

Earlier today, Shah chaired a security review meeting with senior officials in Srinagar.

J-K Lt Governor Manoj Sinha and other senior officials were present at the meeting including J-K Director General of Police Dilbag Singh, top officials of the Army, paramilitary forces, state police and civil administration.

Before concluding his visit to the Union Territory, Shah will also launch and lay foundation stones for various development projects in Srinagar around 3.30 pm.

Earlier on Tuesday, the home minister visited the Shri Mata Vaishno Devi Shrine in Katra where he offered prayers. Notably, this was Shah’s first visit to the holy shrine after being appointed the Home Minister of the Modi government 2.0. His visit, during which he was accompanied by Jammu and Kashmir Lieutenant Governor Manoj Sinha and Union Minister Jitendra Singh, coincided with the ninth day of the ongoing Navratri festival. (ANI)


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Classical Music Playlist, October 5, 2022


Gil Shaham | Photo: Christian Steiner

 

Gil Shaham | Photo: Christian Steiner


Dedicated to and premiered by the virtuoso Spanish violinist Pablo de Sarasate in 1880, the Violin Concerto No. 3 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns is known for its melodic expression and passionate themes. Probably the most enduring of his three violin concertos, it’s today’s Midday Masterpiece at 2:00 pm with soloist Gil Shaham.


6:00 a.m.

Antonio Vivaldi

Trio for violin, lute & continuo in G minor RV 85

Bach Sinfonia; Daniel Abraham, conductor Ronn McFarlane, lute; Marlisa del Cid Woods, violin

6:10 a.m.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

String Quintet No. 3 in C major K 515

Nash Ensemble Philip Dukes, viola

6:45 a.m.

Thomas Simpson

Ricercar

Parley of Instruments; Peter Holman, conductor

6:49 a.m.

Cesar Franck

Symphony: II. Allegretto in D minor

Chicago Symphony Orchestra; Pierre Monteux, conductor

7:00 a.m.

Arcangelo Corelli

Concerto Grosso No. 5 in Bb major Opus 6

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra; Nicholas McGegan, conductor

7:12 a.m.

Giovanni Paisiello

Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major

Saint Cecilia Chamber Orchestra; Pietro Spada, conductor Pietro Spada, piano

7:37 a.m.

Arvo Part

Summa

Attacca Quartet

7:44 a.m.

Johannes Brahms

Hungarian Dance No. 9 in E minor

London Symphony Orchestra; Neeme Jarvi, conductor

7:46 a.m.

Florence Price

Symphony No. 4: III. Juba Dance in D minor

Fort Smith Symphony; John Jeter, conductor

7:53 a.m.

Felix Mendelssohn

Song Without Words “Spring Song” (Book V, No. 6) in A major Opus 62/6

Nikita Magaloff, piano

7:55 a.m.

Morton Gould

Symphonette No. 2: Pavanne

Seattle Symphony; Gerard Schwarz, conductor

8:00 a.m.

Robert Schumann

Piano Quartet: IV. Finale in Eb major Opus 47

Emerson String Quartet Menahem Pressler, piano

8:10 a.m.

Mauro Giuliani

Guitar Concerto No. 1 in A major Opus 30

Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields; Neville Marriner, conductor Pepe Romero, guitar

8:34 a.m.

Sigvaldi Kaldalons; Vikingur Olafsson, arr.

Ave Maria

; Gustavo Dudamel, conductor Vikingur Olafsson, piano

8:38 a.m.

TRADITIONAL

The Boatman

Jeffrey Biegel, piano; Eimear MacGeowan, Irish Flute

8:42 a.m.

Jean Sibelius

Swan of Tuonela

Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra; Mariss Jansons, conductor

8:52 a.m.

Gustav Holst

The Planets: Jupiter, the Bringer of Jolity Opus 32

Philharmonia Orchestra; John Eliot Gardiner, conductor

9:01 a.m.

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Violin Concerto in D major Opus 35

Chicago Symphony Orchestra; Fritz Reiner, conductor Jascha Heifetz, violin

9:32 a.m.

Gentil Montana

Suite Colombiana No. 2: III. Bambuco

Jose Antonio Escobar, guitar

9:36 a.m.

Fanny Mendelssohn

Piano Sonata in G minor

Anna Shelest, piano

9:54 a.m.

Gian Carlo Menotti

AMELIA GOES TO THE BALL Overture

Columbia Symphony Orchestra; Thomas Schippers, conductor

10:00 a.m.

Antonio Vivaldi

Bassoon Concerto in E minor in E minor RV 484

Arion Mathieu Lussier, baroque bassoon

10:11 a.m.

Erich Korngold

The Sea Hawk (1940) Suite

Oregon Symphony; James DePreist, conductor

10:21 a.m.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Piano Concerto No. 5 in D major K 175

English Chamber Orchestra; Jeffrey Tate, conductor Mitsuko Uchida, piano

10:43 a.m.

Jules Massenet

THAIS: Meditation

Berlin Philharmonic; Herbert Von Karajan, conductor Anne-Sophie Mutter, violin

10:51 a.m.

Teresa Carreno

Nocturne No. 10, “Souvenirs de mon pays”

Alexandra Oehler, piano

11:00 a.m.

Ludwig Van Beethoven

FIDELIO Overture Opus 72

Hanover Band; Roy Goodman, conductor

11:07 a.m.

Johann Sebastian Bach

Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F major BWV 1046

Tafelmusik; Jeanne Lamon, conductor

11:28 a.m.

William Walton

Orb & Sceptre

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra; Andre Previn, conductor

11:37 a.m.

Amy Beach

Quartet for Strings Opus 89

Crescent String Quartet

11:53 a.m.

Philip Glass

Glassworks: Opening

Valentina Lisitsa, piano

12:00 p.m.

Georges Bizet

Symphony No. 1 in C major

Orchestre de Paris; Semyon Bychkov, conductor

12:31 p.m.

Johannes Brahms

Rhapsody in G minor Opus 79/2

Martha Argerich, piano

12:39 p.m.

Antonin Dvorak

Symphony No. 8: III. Allegretto grazioso in G major Opus 88

Los Angeles Philharmonic; Gustavo Dudamel, conductor

12:46 p.m.

Florence Price

Fantasy No. 2

Randall Goosby, violin; Zhu Wang, piano

12:52 p.m.

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

MAZEPPA: Gopak

Minnesota Orchestra; Eiji Oue, conductor

12:58 p.m.

Franz Von Suppe

Light Cavalry Overture

Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields; Neville Marriner, conductor

1:06 p.m.

John Williams

Men of the Yorktown March (from Midway)

Boston Pops Orchestra; Keith Lockhart, conductor

1:13 p.m.

Bernhard Crusell

Clarinet Quartet No. 3 in D major Opus 7

Allegri String Quartet (members of) Thea King, clarinet

1:36 p.m.

George Friederich Handel

Concerto Grosso No. 6 in G minor Opus 6/6 HWV 324

Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra; Ton Koopman, conductor

1:52 p.m.

Fanny Mendelssohn

Song Without Words Opus 8/1

Tzimon Barto, piano

2:00 p.m.

Camille Saint-Saens

Violin Concerto No. 3 in B minor Opus 61

New York Philharmonic; Giuseppi Sinopoli, conductor Gil Shaham, violin

2:32 p.m.

Sophie Hutchings

By Night

Voces8 Elitsa Bogdanova, viola; Matthew Sharp, cello; Olivia Jageurs, harp

2:37 p.m.

Antonio Vivaldi

Concerto in D major RV 564

Europa Galante; Fabio Biondi, conductor

2:49 p.m.

Karl Goldmark

Im Fruhling Overture (In Spring) Opus 36

National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland; Stephen Gunzenhauser, conductor

3:00 p.m.

Edvard Grieg

Piano Concerto in A minor Opus 16

Czech National Symphony Orchestra; Stanislav Bogunia, conductor Stewart Goodyear, piano

3:31 p.m.

Giovanni Gabrieli

Canzona Prima a 5

Canadian Brass

3:33 p.m.

Marc-Antoine Charpentier

Te Deum: Prelude

Empire Brass William Kuhlman, organ

3:37 p.m.

Franz Liszt

Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6 “Carnival in Pest” in D major

Weimar State Orchestra; Arthur Fagen, conductor

3:52 p.m.

Missy Mazzoli

Heartbreaker

MIchael Mizrahi, piano

3:58 p.m.

Bernhard Crusell

Clarinet Concerto No. 3 in Bb major Opus 11

Cologne Academy; Michael Alexander Willens, conductor Eric Hoeprich, clarinet

4:24 p.m.

Adolphe Adam

The Nuremberg Doll: Overture (La Poupee de Nuremberg)

Munich Radio Orchestra; Kurt Redel, conductor

4:31 p.m.

Sigvaldi Kaldalons; Vikingur Olafsson, arr.

Ave Maria

; Gustavo Dudamel, conductor Vikingur Olafsson, piano

4:44 p.m.

Morton Gould

American Caprice

Lara Downes, piano

4:50 p.m.

Dobrinka Tabakova

Concerto for Cello and Strings: II. Longing

Lithuanian Chamber Orchestra; Maxim Rysanov, conductor Kristina Blaumane, cello




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‘Hellraiser’ Exclusive: Listen to “Torment of Desire” Off The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

Are you ready to unlock the soundtrack configuration? The newest iteration of the Hellraiser franchise will hit Hulu on Friday, October 7 — and along with it, Lakeshore Records will release Hellraiser (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack). But we’re no Cenobites here at Decider… Instead of teasing you with the delicious agony of waiting, we’re going to give in to your darkest wishes right now, with the exclusive premiere of “Torment of Desire” off the soundtrack by Ben Lovett.

“Torment of Desire” is the 13th track off the album, so spoilers past this point, but in the new Hellraiser we meet a character named Voight, played by professional handsome weirdo Goran Visnjic. He has a mysterious connection to the Cenobites, otherworldly creatures who live for the pain and suffering of others, led by a being nicknamed Pinhead (Jamie Clayton). Into Voight’s world enters Riley (Odessa A’Zion), a down-on-her-luck woman who, through a variety of circumstances, comes into possession of the puzzle box that unlocks the Cenobites’ dimension.

“We have these two different characters at opposite ends of the same journey who have different motives but ultimately whose fates are on a similar trajectory,” Lovett explained in a statement on the track provided to Decider. “The music here is centered around the theme for one character, but emotionally, becomes more focused on what the outcome of his fate implies for the other character, particularly for the hope hers might turn out differently.

“The prepared piano sound was directly inspired by the way the production team had designed the look of the Voight character in the later stages of the film, particularly the ‘gift’ he’s bestowed from the Cenobites. We dressed up a grand piano in all manner of bondage with whips and chains across the strings, twisting pins and screws into them, taping ping pong balls onto the hammers, you name it. It was one of those great ways the visual component can really inspire a sound that gives a character a certain sonic identity.”

Though you may not know Lovett’s name off-hand, you’ve definitely heard his work — particularly if you’re a fan of horror. Among other projects, Lovett has crafted the score for The Signal, The Night House, The Ritual, The Wolf of Snow Hollow, The Wind, and Synchronicity; and even episodes of 30 for 30, the most horrifying show on TV. Just kidding.

The soundtrack, as mentioned, will release Friday, October 7, but you can pre-save it now on all major platforms. Check out the full track list and album art below, and listen to “Torment of Desire” above… If you dare.

Hellraiser (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) Track List:

• Blood Box
• Mansion Party
• Audience with God
• Riley’s Temptation
• Point of No Return
• Forbidden Invocation
• New Blood
• March of the Cenobites
• Myths & Revelations
• Puzzle of the Past
• What Is This Thing
• Seduction & Destruction
• Torment of Desire
• Perpetual Tempest
• Hail to the Priest
• Salacious Deceit
• Cenobite Invasion
• Pleasure of Power
• Nefarious Exchange
• Such Sights to Show You
• Riley’s Choice
• Apotheosis
• Hellraiser (2022) End Titles Suite

Hellraiser Original Soundtrack Album
Photo: Lakeshore Records




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Amit Shah says elections to be held after voters’ li…

J&K Elections: In a major announcement, Union Home Minister Amit Shah on Wednesday said that the elections will be held in Jammu and Kashmir will “full transparency” as soon as the work of compiling the voters’ list is completed.
Shah said that manner in which delimitation has been done in the region, representatives of the people’s choice will be elected. “As soon as the work of compiling the voters’ list is completed, elections will be held in J&K with full transparency. Earlier the delimitation was done in such a way that only the representatives from the three families would be elected, no matter what you do. The delimitation that Election Commission has done, your own representatives will win the elections and rule,” Shah said while addressing a rally in Baramulla on the last day of his three-day visit to J-K.
Assembly polls to elect the government in the Union Territory are due since the abrogation of Articles 370 and 35A on August 5, 2019. The Centre while abrogating the special status of the region, had said that the status of state will be given to Jammu and Kashmir at the appropriate time and the elections will be held after delimitation.
The orders of the Delimitation Commission were effective from May 20 with the Centre choosing the day for the move using powers of the Jammu and Kashmir Reorganisation Act, 2019.
As per the final Delimitation Order, out of the 90 Assembly Constituencies (ACs) in Jammu and Kashmir, 43 will be part of the Jammu region and 47 for the Kashmir region keeping in view the provisions of Section 9(1)(a) of the Delimitation Act, 2002 and Section 60(2)(b) of Jammu & Kashmir Reorganization Act, 2019.
The Delimitation Commission was entrusted with the work of delimiting the Assembly and Parliamentary Constituencies in the UT of Jammu and Kashmir on the basis of the 2011 Census and in accordance with the provisions of Part-V of the Jammu and Kashmir Reorganisation Act, 2019 (34 of 2019) and the provisions of Delimitation Act, 2002(33 of 2002).
Earlier today, Shah chaired a security review meeting with senior officials in Srinagar.
J-K Lt Governor Manoj Sinha and other senior officials were present at the meeting including J-K Director General of Police Dilbag Singh, top officials of the Army, paramilitary forces, state police and civil administration.
Before concluding his visit to the Union Territory, Shah will also launch and lay foundation stones for various development projects in Srinagar around 3.30 pm.
Earlier on Tuesday, the home minister visited the Shri Mata Vaishno Devi Shrine in Katra where he offered prayers. Notably, this was Shah’s first visit to the holy shrine after being appointed the Home Minister of the Modi government 2.0. His visit, during which he was accompanied by Jammu and Kashmir Lieutenant Governor Manoj Sinha and Union Minister Jitendra Singh, coincided with the ninth day of the ongoing Navratri festival.


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Santander Arena hosting comic Kevin Hart, country star Walker Hayes – thereporteronline

Santander Arena, Reading, hosts a couple of major events this week: Comedian and actor Kevin Hart’s Reality Check Tour makes a stop on Thursday at 8 p.m., and country star Walker Hayes brings his Glad You’re Here Tour to town on Friday at 7 p.m. for a sold-out show. Tickets for Hart start at $49.50 at ticketmaster.com.

Hailed as one of the highest-earning stand-up comedians of 2019 by Forbes, Hart sold out over 100 arenas around the world on his previous tour.

Emmy and Grammy nominated, Hart was born and raised in Philadelphia, where he launched his career during an amateur night at a local comedy club. Over the years, he has become a Hollywood box office powerhouse, opening 10 films at No. 1 at the box office and grossing more than $4.23 billion global revenue.

In 2020, Hart released his seventh hour-long stand-up special, which became Netflix’s biggest stand-up special of 2020 and earned him a Grammy nomination for best comedy album. He is a New York Times best-selling author twice over and his first Audible original, “The Decision,” was nominated for an Audie award for best original audiobook in 2021.

Hayes’ album “Country Stuff The Album” came out in Jan. 21 and features the single “AA” and smash hit “Fancy Like,” which has topped every sales and streaming chart since its release, spending a collective six months at the No. 1 spot on the Billboard Country Songs Chart and hitting the Top 5 on Billboard’s Hot 100 Songs.


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Ralph & Katie soundtrack | Every song in The A Word spin-off

As Ralph & Katie arrives on BBC One and BBC iPlayer, viewers will be reconnecting with some of their favourite characters from The A Word, seeing some of the new cast members for the first time and taking in the stunning Lake District scenery.

The series is a six-part comedy drama, with each episode exploring a different scenario and facet of the titular characters’ lives together, now that they are settling into married life and living independently.

The show also features a lively and memorable musical score, and with episodes set at both Valentine’s Day and Christmas, there are of course romantic and festive hits sprinkled in.

But exactly which songs are featured across the series, and who are they by? Read on for a list of all of the songs featured in Ralph & Katie.

Ralph & Katie composer

The series’s musical score has been composed by Adrian Johnston, who has plenty of previous experience when it comes to creating atmospheric and suitably iconic musical themes for TV series.

His previous work has included composing the scores for Strike, Giri/Haji, Four Lives, Summer of Rockets and Dancing on the Edge.

However, while it is predominantly Johnston’s music heard throughout the series’s six episodes, the majority of them also include some use of commercial tunes. You can find a full list of them below.

Ralph & Katie soundtrack: Songs featured in The A Word spin-off

Episode 1 – A Friend in Need…

Leon Harrop as Ralph, Jamie Marie Leary as Emma and Sarah Gordy as Katie in Ralph & Katie.

Leon Harrop as Ralph, Jamie Marie Leary as Emma and Sarah Gordy as Katie in Ralph & Katie. ITV Studios/BBC

5, 6, 7, 8 – Steps

Just the Two of Us – Bill Withers and Grover Washington Jr

Episode 2 – Valentine’s Day

Dylan Brady as Danny and Leon Harrop as Ralph in Ralph & Katie.

Dylan Brady as Danny and Leon Harrop as Ralph in Ralph & Katie. BBC/ITV Studios

It Must Be Love – Madness

Knock On Wood – Amii Stewart

Murder on the Dancefloor – Sophie Ellis-Bextor

The Lady in Red – Chris de Burgh

Episode 3 – Babysitter’s Club

Sarah Gordy and Leon Harrop in Ralph & Katie.

Sarah Gordy as Katie and Leon Harrop as Ralph in Ralph & Katie. BBC/ITV Studios

Clean Up Woman – Betty Wright

Episode 5 – Ralph’s Balls

Leon Harrop as Ralph in Ralph & Katie.

Leon Harrop as Ralph in Ralph & Katie. ITV Studios/BBC

Place To Be – Nick Drake

Lady Divine – Alela Diane

Episode 6 – The Motherships Have Landed

Matt Greenwood as Tom Clarke in Ralph & Katie.

Matt Greenwood as Tom Clarke in Ralph & Katie. ITV Studios/BBC

Merry Xmas Everybody – Slade

Ding Dong Merrily on High

Once in Royal David’s City

Merry Christmas Everyone – Shakin’ Stevens

Lonely This Christmas – Mud

Jingle Bell Rock – Brenda Lee

Ralph & Katie begins airing on BBC One on Wednesday 5th October at 9pm and 9:30pm, with all episodes then available on BBC iPlayer .

Check out our Drama hub for more news, interviews and features or find something to watch with our TV Guide.

The latest issue of Radio Times magazine is on sale now – subscribe now and get the next 12 issues for only £1. For more from the biggest stars in TV, listen to the Radio Times podcast with Jane Garvey.


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