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INXS Fans Mount Campaign For Rock Hall Induction – Billboard

Despite their treasure chest of songs, style and, in their late-80s heyday, the ability to fill stadiums a long way from home, INXS is one of many bands waiting for a Rock Hall nod.

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See latest videos, charts and news

A dedicated group of fans is trying to change that.

change.org petition, simply titled “Induct INXS into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame,” is well on its way to reaching its target of 15,000 signatures.

At the time of writing, more than 11,000 fans have joined the petition, which declares: “After many years of amazing music and dynamic “live” performances, it’s time to ensure the legacy of one of the greatest bands in the world – INXS!”

The campaign was established by “Team Induct INXS,” comprised of fans Dina Ghram, Shanon Steele and Jim Skivalidas.

“All three of us are big music fans and have a deep appreciation of bands that have touched our lives and inspired us throughout the years,” the trio write in a message to Billboard

“INXS is at the top of all three of our lists – we’ve grown up with them, seen them ‘live’, bought all their albums, and come to think of INXS as a family of sorts.”

Alongside the Rock Hall petition, the team invested in a website at inductinxs.com. “We wanted to make sure that the fans knew we were taking this induct campaign seriously,” they explain.

Despite Australia’s renowned pedigree in rock music, few acts from the great southern land have graduated to the Rock Hall.

The Bee Gees and AC/DC are both immortalized, as is Red Hot Chili Peppers bass player Flea, who was born Michael Balzary, in Melbourne. The Bee Gees, AC/DC and INXS are all members of the ARIA Hall of Fame.

Formed in Perth, Australia in 1977, and fronted by the charismatic Michael Hutchence, INXS kicked on to become one of the most popular alternative rock bands of the ‘80s.

Across their career, the new wave act sold over 60 million records worldwide, according to their label, Petrol, and bagged No. 1s on both sides of the Atlantic.

The rockers scored six U.K. top 10 albums (including a best-seller with Welcome to Wherever You Are from 1992) and five U.S. top 20 albums.

The 1987 album Kick went on to become the group’s highest and longest-charting album in the U.S., with a peak of No. 3 on the Billboard 200. It remained on the survey for 81 weeks, and four of its singles cracked the top 10 on the Hot 100: “New Sensation,” “Never Tear Us Apart,” “Devil Inside” and “Need You Tonight,” which led the chart.

INXS was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame in 2001, four years after the death of Hutchence, at age 37. The band has been eligible for induction into the Cleveland, Ohio-based Rock Hall since 2006. 

Though the surviving members of INXS have called time on touring, a popular podcast, INXS: Access All Areas, led by Haydn Murdoch and Bridgit “Bee” Hewitt, explores the band and their many hits, which include “Original Sin,” “What You Need,” “Don’t Change,” “Burn For You,” and others.

The recently-inducted 2022 Rock Hall class included contemporaries Pat Benatar, Eurythmics and Duran Duran, who tapped Nile Rodgers to produce their 1984 hit “The Reflex” after hearing his slick sonic work on “Original Sin.”

“We are not stopping this campaign until INXS is nominated and inducted,” note Team Induct INXS. “This should have happened years ago.”




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Stream It or Skip It?

This hour opens with footage of Deon Cole out at a restaurant with his mother, Charleen. While she asks him about what’s next for him and Netflix, he mostly just nods and smirks while giving side-eye to his camera phone. Will Deon’s new hour be an extension of his Cole Blooded Seminar, his mom wonders? No. Not at all. In fact, nothing will unfold the way she expects, Deon says at the end we should readjust our expectations. So…

The Gist: That special Cole’s mom referenced was the comedian’s debut hour for Comedy Central back in 2016. Since then, he has released a half-hour for Netflix in 2017, an hour for the streaming giant in 2019, and then another 40 minutes of material he’d been workshopping in 2020 which popped up on Netflix’s YouTube channel.

The guy you recognize from Black-ish and Grown-ish has a stand-up persona that’s closer to the guy you recognize from Old Spice commercials.

Cole now finds himself at a crossroads, and not just because he has turned 50. Although that milestone does prompt multiple routines about where he’s at in his life both personally and professionally, complete with lurid descriptions of sex in middle age, and what it means to be a gentleman these days.

What Comedy Specials Will It Remind You Of?: In the past, I’ve compared Cole as a cross between Mike Epps and Nikki Glaser…but I forgot to add former Saturday Night Live writer Jack Handey, because Cole’s signature mid-show bit in which he pulls out a joke book and a pen evokes his own version of Deep Thoughts.

Memorable Jokes: Cole has opinions aplenty on what women of any age should expect of men in terms of sex and relationships, at one point defending himself by suggesting: “Don’t be mad at me. This is God talking to you right now. I’m just a vessel.”

But he receives “testimonial hollers” when he mentions Tracy’s Dog sex toys. Don’t worry, if you’re not aware, he will make you aware “go ahead and put it in your phone…before you forget it” he tells the audience, acting out a woman trying to remember by repeating it as a mantra through gritted grinning teeth. Then he gets howls by humping the air (no stool needed for this guy), and more still when he delivers “the realist shit you’re gonna hear” when it comes to how and why men his age have sex with their partners. You’ll also find out how his preferences in women have changed over the years, and how he has adapted to maintain his player status.

And yet, at the same time, he also wants us to know he embraces his age now, and how it’s impacted his health and sex life alike.

As for Cole’s joke-book section, that 10-minute segment comes halfway through the special. Just as in past performances, he prefaces this all by framing these jokes as half-baked thoughts: “Hopefully they work, and if they do, cool. If they don’t, then I’ll never see y’all ever again.” Here’s one such thought: “You ever curse when you pray?”

And here’s something you don’t often see from a comedian with a Netflix special: Humility?! Cole acknowledges “I don’t think I’m where I need to be at in my career and shit. I think I’m almost there but I ain’t really there.” How he knows he’s not at Rock or Chappelle status, though? I’ll leave that to Cole to tell you himself!

Our Take: Cole manages a commanding presence, such that he induces multiple applause breaks, in several cases even just for introducing the premise. His audience can’t wait to see where he’s going to go with it next. And he’ll admonish them if they don’t seem to be onboard quickly enough. “Should be a few more of y’all clapping,” he tells the Brooklyn crowd after asking a certain demographic to make themselves known, adding: “You know I can see you, right?”

In his first Netflix hour, I noted that Cole seemed to fall in line with other Gen X men in comedy by complaining about what comedians can and cannot say onstage, despite the fact that they’re getting paid handsomely to lodge that very complaint. Clearly he has evolved on that point. Now, Cole commends the younger generations for standing up for their civil rights, acknowledging there are people in his generation who sadly still aren’t living their true lives — because homophobia ran so rampant. So Cole asks Gen Z for a compromise: “Be patient with us being patient with you, alright?”

Turns out there’s more reason for Cole to ask for patience, which he does in a tearjerking way after the crowd applauds his closing bit.

He slowly pulls back the curtain on how the show must go on, no matter what’s going on in the entertainer’s personal life offstage. Unlike a few years ago in his first specials, “we not complaining. It’s part of the job. But you never understand what the comic is going through.”

The pandemic years have been cruel to his family, leaving him virtually alone after his aunt, two uncles, and his mother all have died. He didn’t have a dad growing up, either. “That shit devastated me, and I’ve been f—ed up ever since.” He reveals this taping took place on the first anniversary of her death, and it’s why the special bears her name, so her memory can live on. Cole knows the pandemic has been tough on everyone. He knows, too, that anyone his age (50 and older) also probably shares his pain in losing parents and beloved elders. So he implores us to be kinder to one another. Which he already hinted at earlier in the hour. Because he knows what we all eventually know: Time is currency. Don’t waste it.

Our Call: STREAM IT. Even though we’re the same age, I’m not Cole’s intended audience for much of the hour. And that’s OK. I’m more impressed with his willingness to evolve and show his vulnerabilities onstage than whether or not he’s still acting out sexual moves onstage at his/our age.

Sean L. McCarthy works the comedy beat for his own digital newspaper, The Comic’s Comic; before that, for actual newspapers. Based in NYC but will travel anywhere for the scoop: Ice cream or news. He also tweets @thecomicscomic and podcasts half-hour episodes with comedians revealing origin stories: The Comic’s Comic Presents Last Things First.




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OUR CREATOR LOVES US AND HAS GIVEN US THIS BOOK FREE TO HEAL AND RESTORE US – NINE SOVEREIGN KINGS: THE RETURN OF GOD – Music Industry Today

OUR CREATOR LOVES US AND HAS GIVEN US THIS BOOK FREE TO HEAL AND RESTORE US – NINE SOVEREIGN KINGS: THE RETURN OF GOD – Music Industry Today – EIN Presswire

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INXS Fans Mount Campaign For Rock Hall Induction – Billboard

Despite their treasure chest of songs, style and, in their late-80s heyday, the ability to fill stadiums a long way from home, INXS is one of many bands waiting for a Rock Hall nod.

Explore

See latest videos, charts and news

See latest videos, charts and news

A dedicated group of fans is trying to change that.

change.org petition, simply titled “Induct INXS into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame,” is well on its way to reaching its target of 15,000 signatures.

At the time of writing, more than 11,000 fans have joined the petition, which declares: “After many years of amazing music and dynamic “live” performances, it’s time to ensure the legacy of one of the greatest bands in the world – INXS!”

The campaign was established by “Team Induct INXS,” comprised of fans Dina Ghram, Shanon Steele and Jim Skivalidas.

“All three of us are big music fans and have a deep appreciation of bands that have touched our lives and inspired us throughout the years,” the trio write in a message to Billboard

“INXS is at the top of all three of our lists – we’ve grown up with them, seen them ‘live’, bought all their albums, and come to think of INXS as a family of sorts.”

Alongside the Rock Hall petition, the team invested in a website at inductinxs.com. “We wanted to make sure that the fans knew we were taking this induct campaign seriously,” they explain.

Despite Australia’s renowned pedigree in rock music, few acts from the great southern land have graduated to the Rock Hall.

The Bee Gees and AC/DC are both immortalized, as is Red Hot Chili Peppers bass player Flea, who was born Michael Balzary, in Melbourne. The Bee Gees, AC/DC and INXS are all members of the ARIA Hall of Fame.

Formed in Perth, Australia in 1977, and fronted by the charismatic Michael Hutchence, INXS kicked on to become one of the most popular alternative rock bands of the ‘80s.

Across their career, the new wave act sold over 60 million records worldwide, according to their label, Petrol, and bagged No. 1s on both sides of the Atlantic.

The rockers scored six U.K. top 10 albums (including a best-seller with Welcome to Wherever You Are from 1992) and five U.S. top 20 albums.

The 1987 album Kick went on to become the group’s highest and longest-charting album in the U.S., with a peak of No. 3 on the Billboard 200. It remained on the survey for 81 weeks, and four of its singles cracked the top 10 on the Hot 100: “New Sensation,” “Never Tear Us Apart,” “Devil Inside” and “Need You Tonight,” which led the chart.

INXS was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame in 2001, four years after the death of Hutchence, at age 37. The band has been eligible for induction into the Cleveland, Ohio-based Rock Hall since 2006. 

Though the surviving members of INXS have called time on touring, a popular podcast, INXS: Access All Areas, led by Haydn Murdoch and Bridgit “Bee” Hewitt, explores the band and their many hits, which include “Original Sin,” “What You Need,” “Don’t Change,” “Burn For You,” and others.

The recently-inducted 2022 Rock Hall class included contemporaries Pat Benatar, Eurythmics and Duran Duran, who tapped Nile Rodgers to produce their 1984 hit “The Reflex” after hearing his slick sonic work on “Original Sin.”

“We are not stopping this campaign until INXS is nominated and inducted,” note Team Induct INXS. “This should have happened years ago.”




Source link

DCSS_Unit_00021R.jpg

Stream It or Skip It?

This hour opens with footage of Deon Cole out at a restaurant with his mother, Charleen. While she asks him about what’s next for him and Netflix, he mostly just nods and smirks while giving side-eye to his camera phone. Will Deon’s new hour be an extension of his Cole Blooded Seminar, his mom wonders? No. Not at all. In fact, nothing will unfold the way she expects, Deon says at the end we should readjust our expectations. So…

The Gist: That special Cole’s mom referenced was the comedian’s debut hour for Comedy Central back in 2016. Since then, he has released a half-hour for Netflix in 2017, an hour for the streaming giant in 2019, and then another 40 minutes of material he’d been workshopping in 2020 which popped up on Netflix’s YouTube channel.

The guy you recognize from Black-ish and Grown-ish has a stand-up persona that’s closer to the guy you recognize from Old Spice commercials.

Cole now finds himself at a crossroads, and not just because he has turned 50. Although that milestone does prompt multiple routines about where he’s at in his life both personally and professionally, complete with lurid descriptions of sex in middle age, and what it means to be a gentleman these days.

What Comedy Specials Will It Remind You Of?: In the past, I’ve compared Cole as a cross between Mike Epps and Nikki Glaser…but I forgot to add former Saturday Night Live writer Jack Handey, because Cole’s signature mid-show bit in which he pulls out a joke book and a pen evokes his own version of Deep Thoughts.

Memorable Jokes: Cole has opinions aplenty on what women of any age should expect of men in terms of sex and relationships, at one point defending himself by suggesting: “Don’t be mad at me. This is God talking to you right now. I’m just a vessel.”

But he receives “testimonial hollers” when he mentions Tracy’s Dog sex toys. Don’t worry, if you’re not aware, he will make you aware “go ahead and put it in your phone…before you forget it” he tells the audience, acting out a woman trying to remember by repeating it as a mantra through gritted grinning teeth. Then he gets howls by humping the air (no stool needed for this guy), and more still when he delivers “the realist shit you’re gonna hear” when it comes to how and why men his age have sex with their partners. You’ll also find out how his preferences in women have changed over the years, and how he has adapted to maintain his player status.

And yet, at the same time, he also wants us to know he embraces his age now, and how it’s impacted his health and sex life alike.

As for Cole’s joke-book section, that 10-minute segment comes halfway through the special. Just as in past performances, he prefaces this all by framing these jokes as half-baked thoughts: “Hopefully they work, and if they do, cool. If they don’t, then I’ll never see y’all ever again.” Here’s one such thought: “You ever curse when you pray?”

And here’s something you don’t often see from a comedian with a Netflix special: Humility?! Cole acknowledges “I don’t think I’m where I need to be at in my career and shit. I think I’m almost there but I ain’t really there.” How he knows he’s not at Rock or Chappelle status, though? I’ll leave that to Cole to tell you himself!

Our Take: Cole manages a commanding presence, such that he induces multiple applause breaks, in several cases even just for introducing the premise. His audience can’t wait to see where he’s going to go with it next. And he’ll admonish them if they don’t seem to be onboard quickly enough. “Should be a few more of y’all clapping,” he tells the Brooklyn crowd after asking a certain demographic to make themselves known, adding: “You know I can see you, right?”

In his first Netflix hour, I noted that Cole seemed to fall in line with other Gen X men in comedy by complaining about what comedians can and cannot say onstage, despite the fact that they’re getting paid handsomely to lodge that very complaint. Clearly he has evolved on that point. Now, Cole commends the younger generations for standing up for their civil rights, acknowledging there are people in his generation who sadly still aren’t living their true lives — because homophobia ran so rampant. So Cole asks Gen Z for a compromise: “Be patient with us being patient with you, alright?”

Turns out there’s more reason for Cole to ask for patience, which he does in a tearjerking way after the crowd applauds his closing bit.

He slowly pulls back the curtain on how the show must go on, no matter what’s going on in the entertainer’s personal life offstage. Unlike a few years ago in his first specials, “we not complaining. It’s part of the job. But you never understand what the comic is going through.”

The pandemic years have been cruel to his family, leaving him virtually alone after his aunt, two uncles, and his mother all have died. He didn’t have a dad growing up, either. “That shit devastated me, and I’ve been f—ed up ever since.” He reveals this taping took place on the first anniversary of her death, and it’s why the special bears her name, so her memory can live on. Cole knows the pandemic has been tough on everyone. He knows, too, that anyone his age (50 and older) also probably shares his pain in losing parents and beloved elders. So he implores us to be kinder to one another. Which he already hinted at earlier in the hour. Because he knows what we all eventually know: Time is currency. Don’t waste it.

Our Call: STREAM IT. Even though we’re the same age, I’m not Cole’s intended audience for much of the hour. And that’s OK. I’m more impressed with his willingness to evolve and show his vulnerabilities onstage than whether or not he’s still acting out sexual moves onstage at his/our age.

Sean L. McCarthy works the comedy beat for his own digital newspaper, The Comic’s Comic; before that, for actual newspapers. Based in NYC but will travel anywhere for the scoop: Ice cream or news. He also tweets @thecomicscomic and podcasts half-hour episodes with comedians revealing origin stories: The Comic’s Comic Presents Last Things First.




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Dave Chappelle makes surprise entry at Chris Rock-Kevin Hart show

LOS ANGELES: Jon Stewart, a close friend and fellow comic of Dave Chappelle, has defended the latter’s contentious but well-watched “Saturday Night Live monologue,” which the Anti-Defamation League criticised for normalising anti-Semitic views.

Stewart refuted the notion that Chappelle “normalised anti-semitism” with his 15-minute remark on the most recent scandals involving Kanye West and Kyrie Irving during his appearance on “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert,” according to Vanity Fair.

“I’m not sure if you’ve visited the comment sections of the majority of news items, but it’s remarkably common. As you are aware, it is very natural “said Stewart. “But I will say this: I don’t think that restriction and punishment are the best ways to stop anti-Semitism or prevent understanding. I disagree with that and think we should not address the issue in that manner.” Stewart concurred with the comedian that “it shouldn’t be this hard to talk about things,” according to Vanity Fair. Stewart was in attendance at the Los Angeles comedy show when Chappelle was attacked onstage following his set in May.

He added the following: “Due to my opposition to Israel’s treatment of Palestinians, I am accused of being anti-semitic. Depending on the different ideas I have, I get called different things by different individuals. How can we move forward, whether it be through comedy, debate, or anything else, if we lack the ability to confront one another with reality? If we all simply shut it down, we retire to our own isolated dens of false information, where it spreads. The entire purpose of this is to prevent it from spreading and to talk about it openly.” In response, Colbert asserted that viewers “have the right to have a negative reaction to what people say onstage,” even though “any comic has the right to say anything they want,” Vanity Fair said.

He continued by saying that just because someone “saw a dissemination, even with a comic goal, of anti-semitic tropes, doesn’t indicate the individual is an anti-Semite.” As an alternative, Stewart suggested that individuals “play with clichés” and that comedians like Chappelle and himself “rely on those prejudices as a shorthand for our material.” I know you don’t like Jews, I see it in your eyes, he later jokingly informed Colbert. The host retorted, “Really just one of you,” after pausing. In order to close the piece, Colbert repeated the opening lines of Chappelle’s monologue: He said, “A contrast,” “I simply wanted to say that I detest anti-Semitism in all of its manifestations and I stand with all of my friends in the Jewish community.”

Paris Hilton disputes claim that she is “struggling” to get pregnant

“The Censors cut that”, Meenakshi Seshadri on her Kissing scene with Sunny Deol

Harsh Varrdhan Kapoor says audience care more about who date and less about films

 


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INXS Fans Mount Campaign For Rock Hall Induction – Billboard

Despite their treasure chest of songs, style and, in their late-80s heyday, the ability to fill stadiums a long way from home, INXS is one of many bands waiting for a Rock Hall nod.

Explore

See latest videos, charts and news

See latest videos, charts and news

A dedicated group of fans is trying to change that.

change.org petition, simply titled “Induct INXS into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame,” is well on its way to reaching its target of 15,000 signatures.

At the time of writing, more than 11,000 fans have joined the petition, which declares: “After many years of amazing music and dynamic “live” performances, it’s time to ensure the legacy of one of the greatest bands in the world – INXS!”

The campaign was established by “Team Induct INXS,” comprised of fans Dina Ghram, Shanon Steele and Jim Skivalidas.

“All three of us are big music fans and have a deep appreciation of bands that have touched our lives and inspired us throughout the years,” the trio write in a message to Billboard

“INXS is at the top of all three of our lists – we’ve grown up with them, seen them ‘live’, bought all their albums, and come to think of INXS as a family of sorts.”

Alongside the Rock Hall petition, the team invested in a website at inductinxs.com. “We wanted to make sure that the fans knew we were taking this induct campaign seriously,” they explain.

Despite Australia’s renowned pedigree in rock music, few acts from the great southern land have graduated to the Rock Hall.

The Bee Gees and AC/DC are both immortalized, as is Red Hot Chili Peppers bass player Flea, who was born Michael Balzary, in Melbourne. The Bee Gees, AC/DC and INXS are all members of the ARIA Hall of Fame.

Formed in Perth, Australia in 1977, and fronted by the charismatic Michael Hutchence, INXS kicked on to become one of the most popular alternative rock bands of the ‘80s.

Across their career, the new wave act sold over 60 million records worldwide, according to their label, Petrol, and bagged No. 1s on both sides of the Atlantic.

The rockers scored six U.K. top 10 albums (including a best-seller with Welcome to Wherever You Are from 1992) and five U.S. top 20 albums.

The 1987 album Kick went on to become the group’s highest and longest-charting album in the U.S., with a peak of No. 3 on the Billboard 200. It remained on the survey for 81 weeks, and four of its singles cracked the top 10 on the Hot 100: “New Sensation,” “Never Tear Us Apart,” “Devil Inside” and “Need You Tonight,” which led the chart.

INXS was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame in 2001, four years after the death of Hutchence, at age 37. The band has been eligible for induction into the Cleveland, Ohio-based Rock Hall since 2006. 

Though the surviving members of INXS have called time on touring, a popular podcast, INXS: Access All Areas, led by Haydn Murdoch and Bridgit “Bee” Hewitt, explores the band and their many hits, which include “Original Sin,” “What You Need,” “Don’t Change,” “Burn For You,” and others.

The recently-inducted 2022 Rock Hall class included contemporaries Pat Benatar, Eurythmics and Duran Duran, who tapped Nile Rodgers to produce their 1984 hit “The Reflex” after hearing his slick sonic work on “Original Sin.”

“We are not stopping this campaign until INXS is nominated and inducted,” note Team Induct INXS. “This should have happened years ago.”




Source link