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Kevin Hart wheelchair-bound at 44 [watch]

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On Wednesday, 23 August, American actor and comedian Kevin Hart revealed that he was in a wheelchair after having raced former NFL player Steven Ridley. In an Instagram post, the Get Hard actor explained how he got to be wheelchair-bound and had his friends and social media followers sympathising with him.

‘GOTTA WARM UP’: KEVIN HART IN A WHEELCHAIR

Kevin Hart shared that he wanted to break the news of being in a wheelchair before his opponent Steven Ridley put him on blast on his social media page. He explained that he had challenged himself in a sprint race with Ridley and suffered injuries which he believes were brought on by aging.

“I’ve got to be the stupidest man alive. Ladies and gentlemen, the age 40 is real. All my men and women out there that are 40 years old and above, it’s not a game, respect that age or that age will make you respect it,” he said.

ALSO READ: Kevin Hart and Nick Cannon to host ‘Celebrity Prank Wars’

Sitting in a wheelchair, in a video, Hart revealed that he had suffered injuries from the sprint race and could no longer walk.

“I tore my lower abdomen and abductors and muscles found in the hip, I don’t even know what that is, but I tore them. I tore those too, I can’t walk,” he shared.

In a slow-motion video, Hart can be seen in distress during his race with Ridley just moments after taking off.   

“44 and sitting my a** down!!!!! I got to be the dumbest man alive!!!!! What the f**k am I doing???? I blew my sh*t… I’m done. FML,” the hilarious actor captioned.

In 2019, Hart had three repaired spine fractures after he got involved in a car accident during Labor Day weekend, TMZ reported. According to a source speaking with the publication, Hart had undergone surgery and had one of his fractures fused in the lumbar. Although the surgery was a success, he reportedly faced risks of having difficulties walking, and at worst, partial paralysis of the arms or legs had it not gone well.

ALSO READ: Afrocentrism accusations: Kevin Hart’s Egypt show cancelled

Kevin Hart
Kevin Hart injured his leg in a race. Image via Instagram @kevinhart4real

TAKE A LOOK AT SOME REACTIONS FROM THE ACTOR’S SOCIAL MEDIA FOLLOWERS BELOW…

“You gotta warm up for about 10 minutes big fella!😂” @marioworldwide replied.

“😂😂😂😂 damm man! Sorry about that! 🙏🏾 May you quickly recover and remember not to race against anyone,” @naymaps wrote.

“Getting older is REAL!! Heal Up, Kev!!” @willsmith said.

“Welp if it will make you feel better at 66 I don’t even have abs or adductors, just use your stomach 💪🏽💪🏽💪🏽heal up Nephew,” @iamsteveharveytv commented.

“😂😂😂😂 so sorry and 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣,” @traceellisross reacted.

ALSO READ: Double take: Apparently author Khaya Dlanga is Kevin Hart’s twin?



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What’s On: Your guide to what’s happening in Rotorua, Tauranga and the Bay of Plenty region

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There’s plenty happening in the Bay of Plenty. Photo / 123rf

September

Friday, August 25 to Sunday, September 10: Kurungaituku netball tournament. Rotorua Netball’s 88th year of hosting the end-of-season social netball tournament for all grades of players. Held over three weekends. A staggering 600+ games of netball are played each weekend. We host teams from all over NZ and often some international teams too. Play begins at 8am until 4pm and all spectators are welcome.

Thursday, August 31 to Saturday, September 9: Priscilla Queen of the Desert — The Musical. A heartwarming, uplifting story of three friends who hop aboard a battered old bus searching for love and friendship and end up finding more than they had ever dreamed of. Sir Howard Morrison Centre. Tickets via Ticketmaster.

Saturday, September 2 to Friday, September 8: Zespri Aims Games. The Zespri AIMS Games is the largest junior sporting event in Australasia, held annually in Tauranga Moana. It provides 11-, 12- and 13-year old’s an opportunity to compete as an individual or a team across 20+ sporting codes.

Saturday, September 2: NPC — Bay of Plenty Steamers v Otago. Rotorua International Stadium 2.05pm to 6pm. Gates open 11.05am, curtain raiser 11.35am (Bay of Plenty Ngawha v North Harbour). Steamers v Otago Kick off 2.05pm.

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Saturday, September 2: Rockaria — The ELO Experience. A show that delivers a live concert, recreating the sound of Jeff Lynne’s The Electric Light Orchestra. Performing classics such as Evil Woman, Living Thing, Don’t Bring Me Down, Telephone Line, Rockaria and many more. Also including songs by Jeff Lynne’s The Travelling Wilburys such as Handle Me With Care, End of the Line, and Last Night. Baycourt theatre, 7.30pm, tickets via Ticketek.

 Goldsmith and Baynes.
Goldsmith and Baynes.

Sunday, September 3: Goldsmith Baynes at Rotorua Jazz Club. Allana Goldsmith’s soulful jazz vocal combines with Mark Baynes’ contemporary jazz stylings to produce this remarkable ensemble. In Rotorua they will be presenting jazz standards as well as their own compositions. 2022 album E Rere Rā. Rotorua Citizens Club 4.30pm to 8pm $20 casual, $10 members, $2 students.

Sunday, September 3: Be a seller at the Ōtūmoetai Rotary Club Car Boot Sale — it’s the last one before Daylight Saving begins. Ōtūmoetai College carpark. Opens for sellers to set up at 7.30am. Buyers welcome at 8am. Runs until 11am or it’s all gone. Sellers $10 a space. Proceeds for Rotary projects. Contact Brian 0211 1228735 or Bevan 027 4612127 for details.

Sunday, September 3: Tauranga Musica Argyle Trio (Wilma & Friends) at X-Space Baycourt at 4pm. Wilma Smith violin, Matthias Balzat cello, Laurance Matheson piano. Tickets at Baycourt box office.

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Thursday, September 7: Half of the Sky. The Rose sisters journey home for a weekend of birthday celebrations beside their awa. Ny, Rua and Rika find themselves caught in a whirlwind of realisations, as incomplete truths become whole, and the ties that bind their whānau together are tested. Sir Howard Morrison Centre. Tickets via Ticketmaster.

Monday, September 11: Coterie — Aronui Indigenous Arts Festival. Nau mai te wiki o Te Reo Māori! Join us, for the sweet-soulful vibes of this band of Māori brothers, who whakapapa to Tauranga Moana ft their te reo Māori hit song, Purea.

Thursday, September 14: Pōhutu — Aronui Indigenous Arts Festival. Pōhutu is an ode to the human experience navigating the ever-shifting nature of memory, time, place and loss. Created by visionary Aotearoa artists, choreographer Bianca Hyslop, designer Rowan Pierce and Mātanga Mātauranga Māori Tūī Matira Ranapiri-Ransfield. The work has two performers and is innovative in its use of image and design-based storytelling. Incorporating traditional and contemporary dance/movement practices it is a highly visceral experience for audience members and offers a truly live performance experience. Sir Howard Morrison Centre. Tickets via Ticketmaster.

Saturday, September 16: Miss Rotorua — Crowning Night. Sir Howard Morrison Centre. Join us for a night of gowns and geysers, where a predominantly indigenous cohort share their talents to be crowned, Miss Rotorua 2023. Led by Māori fashion designer and leader, Kharl Wirepa.

Sunday, September 17: Gift of Music Concert at Western Heights High School, 2pm. Come and enjoy a variety showcase of local youth talent across the arts, and support the Michael Pilaar Memorial Fund. Four more scholarships to young musicians will be awarded at the concert. Tickets $15 and $5, available at the door.

Sunday, September 17: NPC — Bay of Plenty Steamers v Wellington. Rotorua International Stadium 2.05pm to 6pm. Gates open 11.05am, curtain raiser 11.35am (BOP Toa U19 vs Auckland U19). Steamers v Wellington Kick off 2.05pm.

Thursday, September 21: Kairākau, Red Carpet Premiere — Aronui Indigenous Arts Festival. Step inside the world of historic Māori Warriors, Kairākau, as they battle for life and death in this action drama series. Sir Howard Morrison Centre, Sir Owen Glenn Theatre. Tickets via Ticketmaster.

Thursday, September 21 to Saturday, October 7: Matilda The Musical — Tauranga Musical Theatre. The story of an extraordinary girl who, armed with a vivid imagination and a sharp mind, dares to take a stand and change her own destiny. Inspired by the twisted genius of Roald Dahl, the Tony Award-winning Roald Dahl’s Matilda The Musical is the captivating masterpiece from the Royal Shakespeare Company that revels in the anarchy of childhood, the power of imagination, and the inspiring story of a girl who dreams of a better life.

Saturday, September 23: Dr Seuss’s The Cat in the Hat. Sir Howard Morrison Theatre. Two bored kids, one rainy day, and one crazy cat wearing a red-striped hat. In 1957, Dr Seuss used only 200 words to write his classic tale. More than 50 years later, The Cat in the Hat is a much-loved children’s phenomenon. Tickets via Ticketmaster.

October

Sunday, October 1: Tauranga STEM Festival. STEMFest will showcase 50+ exhibitors from across Aotearoa. Bringing organisations that are creating and developing amazing things around science, technology, engineering, and mathematics together under one umbrella.

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Saturday, October 8: Sun to Surf — Run and Walk, Ōhope — 21.1km, 10km, 5km or kids’ 1km. Hang out in the Sun to Surf Craft Food and Beverage Village and enjoy entertainment in the beautiful Mahy Reserve.

Thursday, October 12: Ladies Night — Nationwide Tour 2023. This comedy is about to get its gear off again, in a nationwide tour this October. This hilarious new production of Ladies Night promises to be this year’s funniest night out as these real Kiwi blokes dare each other to put on a male strip show, after falling down on their luck and needing some extra cash. Sir Howard Morrison Theatre. Tickets via Ticketmaster.

The Ultimate Drag Show brings a line-up of Wellington's fiercest drag queens and kings to Baycourt Community and Arts Centre.
The Ultimate Drag Show brings a line-up of Wellington’s fiercest drag queens and kings to Baycourt Community and Arts Centre.

Friday, October 13: The Ultimate Drag Show. Baycourt Addison Theatre. The Ultimate Drag Show features a sensational line-up of Wellington’s fiercest drag queens and kings who are bringing you gag-worthy lip-syncs and drag excellence that’ll leave you screaming shantay, you all stay. Tickets via Ticketek.

Monday, October 16: Somi Kim: Mozart and More! A winner of the Royal Over-Seas League Accompanist Prize and the Gerald Moore Award for Accompanists, Somi enjoys an impressive career as a chamber musician and soloist. She performs as the official pianist of NZTrio, one of New Zealand’s most indispensable ensembles. Somi was recently awarded the Associate of the Royal Academy of Music (ARAM) to recognise her contribution to music. Sir Howard Morrison Centre, Sir Owen Glenn Theatre. Tickets via Ticketmaster.

October 19 to 29: Tauranga Arts Festival. The festival is 10 days of music, theatre, comedy and visual arts. Escape is delivered in alternate years to the festival and is a readers and writers weekend with thought-provoking talks.

The Haka Party Incident, Tauranga Arts Festival.
The Haka Party Incident, Tauranga Arts Festival.

Thursday, October 19: Tauranga Arts Festival — The Haka Party Incident will open the 2023 festival at Baycourt Community and Arts Centre. Following its renowned sold-out premiere season in 2021, this groundbreaking work will come to Tauranga following a six-centre tour that has played to standing ovations and sell-out crowds.

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Stand-up comedian Wilson Dixon  is performing at the  Tauranga Arts Festival in October.
Stand-up comedian Wilson Dixon is performing at the Tauranga Arts Festival in October.

Thursday, October 26: Tauranga Arts Festival — Wilson Dixon stand-up comedy. He claims to be the greatest country singer Cripple Creek, Colorado has ever produced — in fact, he is the only country singer Cripple Creek has ever produced, but doesn’t let that stand in the way of a wealth of funny stories and songs about his extended family and horse Andrew.

Saturday, October 22: Vegan Vibes, Soper Reserve, Mount Maunganui 10am to 3pm. Vegan Vibes will bring a curated line-up of some of some favourite local and national brands that epitomise the vegan lifestyle along with a great host of speakers, workshops and live music.

November

Sunday, November 5 to Monday, November 6: The Royal Czech Ballet — Sleeping Beauty at Baycourt Addison Theatre. Sleeping Beauty follows the story of Princess Aurora. When the bad fairy Carabosse is not invited by the King to the Princess’ christening, she casts a spell on the Princess that will mean she will die if pricked by a needle from the age of 16. The King tries to protect his daughter by banning all needles in the Kingdom, however Princess Aurora accidently pricks her finger on her 16th birthday. 100 years later, a handsome prince stumbles upon the Sleeping Beauty, Princess Aurora, where she is awoken from her sleep and witchcraft is defeated. Tickets via Ticketek.

Friday, November 10 to Saturday, November 11: Legend of the Peak, Redwoods — Whakarewarewa Forest. New Zealand Forest Marathon — 4 Peaks — 42km, Moerangi Half Marathon — 2.5 Peaks — 21km, Titokorangi 10K — 2 Peaks — 10km, 5K Trig Loop — 1 Peak — 5km, Kids Forest Run — 2km.

Saturday, November 11: Queen — It’s a Kinda Magic. Get ready for a night of non-stop rock anthems including We Will Rock You, We Are the Champions, Radio GaGa, I Want to Break Free, Somebody to Love, Don’t Stop Me Now, Another One Bites the Dust, A Kind of Magic, Bohemian Rhapsody and so many more. You’ve seen Bohemian Rhapsody at the cinemas, now see it all come alive on stage and in concert, with big sound, big screens, crazy lighting and outlandish costumes. Baycourt Addison Theatre. Tickets via Ticketek.

Friday, November 17: Cosmic Psychos New Zealand tour — Totara St. The Cosmic Psychos are (almost) an Australian punk rock institution who formed in Spring Plains, Victoria in 1982, spearheaded by founding member and bass player Ross Knight.

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Saturday, November 25: Polo in the Bay, Trustpower, Baypark — a fresh, fast-paced format designed for spectators that requires zero polo knowledge to enjoy. The event will feature some of NZ’s most talented players going head-to-head in their provincial colours. Teams include Auckland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty and Hawke’s Bay. Gates open at 2pm , first game 2.30pm.

December

Saturday, December 2: Rotorua A&P Show — Agrodome Rotorua, 8.30am to 5pm.

Sunday, December 10: The Sweet Caroline Tour: A Tribute to Neil Diamond. Baycourt theatre. Take a step back into the glory days of music and musicianship with this beautiful tribute concert, featuring Sweet Caroline, Cherry Cherry, Red Red Wine, Crunchy Granola Suite, Shilo, Cracklin’ Rosie, You Don’t Bring Me Flowers, Both Sides Now, Heartlight, Forever In Blue Jeans, Song Sung Blue, Brother Love’s Travelling Salvation Show, I Am… I Said, Girl You’ll Be a Woman Soon and more.

Regular events

Now until September 23: I/O Exhibition at Kūwao Space at 35 Devonport Rd, Tauranga. An exhibition fusing technology and tradition. Featuring artists Kauri Wharewera and Kereama Taepa.

Sunday, July 30 to Sunday, September 24: RATS Winter Duathlon Series 2023. Three events over three months — Sunday, July 30, Sunday, August 27, and Sunday, September 24. Mountain Bike Rotorua. Entries at www.rats.org.nz.

October 9 to December 4: Skate Fit Class. Join Moana Roller Derby for fun and fitness on skates with our NEW Skate Fit Classes. These classes are an awesome mixture of fitness drills and strength exercises – and it’s all done on roller skates. Open to all, 16 years and older. You must have a basic level of skating ability (be able to stand up and skate/roll with some confidence, without assistance) and your own skates and protective gear. Mondays 6-7pm from October 9 – December 4 (excl Labour Day) at Mount Sport Centre. $80 for 8 classes. See Moana Roller Derby on Facebook for more info.

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Now until January 31: Western Bay Museum presents Treasures of Culture. An opportunity for the Katikati community to share personal taonga / treasures as a way celebrating our community’s rich diversity and honouring the traditions and stories of those who make this place such a vibrant and dynamic place to live.

Weekly: Cards 500 at the Mount Community Hall every Tuesday and Thursday 12.30 to 4pm. Afternoon tea provided. All welcome. Inquiries to phone 0276586848.

Tuesdays: Rotorua District Cadet Unilt Parades — if you’re Year 9 and up, come along to see if you are the next Cadet to join the ranks. Where: 23 Geddes Rd, Rotorua on Tuesdays, during school term, 6.15pm to 9pm.

Thursdays: Rotorua Night Market, weekly at Tutanekai St from 5pm until 9pm. Weather dependant.

Thursdays: The Mount Art group meets every Thursday at St Peters Anglican church hall, 15 Victoria Rd at the Mount, from 9am until midday. Call Merilynn on 0274846874 for more information.

Thursdays: Air Training Corp, Parade during term weeks from 6.15pm at 23 Geddes Rd. Age 13-plus. Come down and have a look or contact cucdr.75sqn@cadetforces.org.nz for more information. You are welcome to come and have a look.

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Fridays: Friday Night Fun Night at Baywave Enjoy two hours of racing down the Hydroslide, bobbing through the waves in our wave pool and bombing off a special platform to the latest tunes for $6 per person. From 6pm to 8pm Fridays, excluding public and school holidays.

Saturdays: Kuirau Park Saturday Market , operated by the Rotorua North Rotary Club, opens every Saturday morning, wet or fine, 7am to 2pm. Stalls selling vegetables, wide range of takeaway food, coffee, meat, jewellery, clothing, massages, gift cards, and more. Proceeds used in the community. Sites for stalls cost $30.

Saturdays: Tauranga Farmers Market rain or shine, 7.45am to midday at Tauranga Primary School.

Saturdays: Book sale on the first, third and holiday Saturday of each month. All funds raised go back to the library. From 9am to 1pm at Kuirau Park.

Saturdays: The Little Big Markets Mount Maunganui at Coronation Park on the first, third and last Saturday of every month from 9am to 2pm.

Saturdays: The Greerton Hall Market on the second and last Saturday of every month from 8am to 12pm.

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Sundays: Waihi Beach Sunday Market 9am to 1pm at Wilson Park.

Daily: Government Gardens Guided Tours, 11am, outside Rotorua Museum.

Monthly: Sol Markets at Simpson Reserve includes products, services and information from local stallholders that consider sustainability in their business practises. From 9am to 2pm on the first Sunday of the month.

Monthly: The Little Big Markets Pāpāmoa from 9am to 2pm at The Pāpāmoa Pony Club. January 15, February 19, March 19 and April 23.

Monthly: Geyserland Country Music Club meets on the first Wednesday from 1pm-3pm and the third Sunday of the month from 1pm -4.30pm at the Rotorua Bowling Club. Non-members $5, children under 13 free. For more information go to Geyserland Country Music Club Facebook page.

Monthly: Rotorua UkeBox Ukulele Open Mic and Strum Along. Third Sunday of the month, 3pm to 4.30pm at Te Runanga Tea House. Free to strum or sing along or watch.

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Monthly: Western Bay Crop Swap, a free event for backyard gardeners, home bakers and food foragers to swap and share high quality local food on the first Saturday of the month, 10am to 11am at SuperGrans Western Bay of Plenty, 14 Jocelyn St, Katikati.

Monthly: Rotorua Jazz Club meets first Sunday of every month, 4.30pm to 8pm, winter and summer. Rotorua Citizens Club, Arawa St. $20 entry for adults, $2 for juniors. The public is always welcome. For upcoming events and bands go to Rotorua Jazz Club Facebook page or email rotjazzclub@gmail.com.

Monthly: Historic Village Wellbeing Market on the third Saturday of the month from 10am to 3pm.

Monthly: Omokoroa Market featuring arts and crafts, produce, plants and car boot, plus more. Held on the last Saturday of the month 9am to midday at Omokoroa Settlers Hall.

Monthly: Maketū Market from 7am at Maketū Village Green on the third and fifth Sunday of the month. Vendor stalls $10. Phone Maureen 021 2671 685

Monthly: Improv Comedy with The Honest Liars — 16th Ave Theatre. First Saturday of the month 7.30pm to 9pm, entry $15.

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Monthly: BOP Blues Club Jam, first Wednesday of the month. 7.30pm to 10.30pm. Rotorua Citizens Club.

Monthly: Art By Bike Tours, third Saturday of the month, (finishes April 15) 10am, Te Manawa.

Fortnightly: Pakihi Ora Māori Business Network Māori Business Rōpū focused on bringing together and supporting ngā pakihi Māori. Anchored in Māori values, knowledge and cultural practices, dedicated to creating spaces that are mana-enhancing. A place where Māori business owners can come together and feel connected through mātauranga. This is a Wednesday fortnightly kaupapa held at Kai Caff Aye, Fenton St, 7.30am — 9.00am. Visit Pakihi Ora on Facebook for more information.

■ What’s On runs weekly. To include your event, email details to whatson@dailypost.co.nz at least a week before the event.

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For more than 50 years, Bill Hillgrove’s voice has been ‘th…

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Before he called Tony Dorsett’s 303rd rushing yard against Notre Dame in 1975, Kenny Pickett’s fake slide in the 2021 ACC championship game or M.J. Devonshire’s pick-6 against West Virginia last year, Bill Hillgrove’s first venture behind a microphone required him to play the part of a brat.

It was in a live production of a series of stories about a Catholic family in the 1950s that aired on WDUQ entitled “Morning, Noon and Night.”

Hillgrove was 13.

Seventy years later, he’s still holding onto a microphone, and he’ll be at Acrisure Stadium on Saturday — his partner and color analyst Pat Bostick by his side — beginning his 50th season calling play-by-play of Pitt football.

Then, on Sept. 10, he’ll be back at Acrisure for the Pittsburgh Steelers’ opener, starting his 30th season with the professional team in town.

Later this fall, Hillgrove will be inside Petersen Events Center to tip off his 55th season of Pitt basketball.

“Being around somebody like that is the reason why I always wanted to go to Pitt,” said former Pitt All-American tight end Dorin Dickerson, who handles sideline duties with Larry Richert during Panthers broadcasts on 93.7 FM. “There are people and staples at Pitt that everybody knows, and everybody knows Bill Hillgrove. To hear him call my name for a touchdown, it’s a surreal feeling. He’s one of those people, you just don’t get tired of listening to him.”

Bostick is starting his 11th season with Hillgrove.

“From the first time I worked with him,” Bostick said, “his presence, his voice, his recall, his passion are all evident. But what I think people don’t get to see is what a professional he is, how much work he puts into it.”

Added Richert: “It’s the voice that is the soundtrack to our sports memories.”

The kick-start to Hillgrove’s career came from his aunt, Sister Mary Bernard O’Brien of the Sisters of Charity. Sister Mary had a friend, Sister Rosalie, who ran the Pittsburgh Diocesan Radio/TV school.

“She said you like to putz around with radios like your dad (who was an electrician),” Hillgrove told the Tribune-Review on Thursday morning. “Why don’t you go there and see what you can learn?

“I show up, and (Sister Rosalie) handed me a script and said, ‘Read it.’ I read it, and she said, ‘Exactly what I’m looking for, a 13-year-old brat.’ ”

Hillgrove’s response: “I don’t need a script for that, Sister.”

And off he went.

“At a young age, I discovered I had a talent for being on this side of the microphone,” he said.

Hillgrove graduated from Duquesne University in 1962 — so long ago, he said, recalling the old joke, “The Dead Sea wasn’t even sick.”

He was former play-by-play man Ed Conway’s color analyst for four seasons, ascending to the lead chair when Conway died in 1974.

Johnny Sauer, a West Point man who coached in college and the NFL, was named the color man. Hillgrove’s first game was at Florida State on Sept. 14, 1974, but Sauer, who also worked for CBS-TV, was scheduled to work an NFL game that weekend.

The legendary Myron Cope pinch-hit for Sauer during Pitt’s 9-6 victory, lamenting the bugs — Cope called them “love bugs” — that infested the visitors’ radio booth at Doak Campbell Stadium in Tallahassee, Fla.

Cope also filled in for Sauer during the 1983 season. Hillgrove remembers Cope trying to beg off when the boss said, “You have to double up.” Cope also was doing Steelers games.

“I’m busy enough,” Hillgrove recalls Cope pleading to the boss. “I have morning commentaries, evening commentaries, TV commentaries, the talk show. And the boss said, ‘But your contract is up in January.’

“Cope said, “I’m all ears.”

“It was great for me,” Hillgrove said, “because it was an introductory to what it was like to work with him and develop chemistry, and that served me well when the Steelers came calling.”

Along with Sauer and Bostick, some of the region’s most recognizable sports figures have worked with Hillgrove, including Dick Groat, Tunch Ilkin, Craig Wolfley, Merril Hoge, Bill Osborn and Bill Fralic.

Asked to name his favorite Pitt coach, Hillgrove rattled off the names Johnny Majors, Jackie Sherrill, Dave Wannstedt and Pat Narduzzi. Asked to pick one, he chose Majors, who led Pitt to a national championship in 1976.

“He was a dream, always conscious of the public, always conscious of the image,” Hillgrove said. “We’d sit in the room when he edited the footage for “The Johnny Majors Show” and he said, ‘Take that play out. It showed too many empty seats.’

“He was the perfect fit. He made a miracle happen, and it was a miracle.”

Bostick said he learned how Hillgrove approaches a broadcast the first time they shared a booth.

“First game I called, I knew he got the running back wrong on a touchdown run,” Bostick said, “and I waited to break and I told him. That’s the only time Billy yelled at me. ‘Partner, you have to correct me.’

“He doesn’t care about making a mistake. He’ll own up to it. The listeners are most important to him. He just wants the listener to know the truth. I don’t think everyone’s like that.”

Bostick said working the ACC championship game with Hillgrove is among their most memorable moments together.

“For (the Pitt victory) to mean as much as it did to the program and to have him narrate Pitt and to be right next to him as he did it in real time, it was like something out of a movie, man. It was really cool.”

Before that, there was the lightning delay at the Syracuse game at Heinz Field in 2018.

“He said, ‘Partner, we’re going to need to tap dance for a while.’ We ended up talking about jazz. We ended up talking about Count Basie. It was special.

“He’s bigger than life.”

Hillgrove said he doesn’t like “the earthquakes” that are happening in college football, referring to conference realignment.

“I don’t like the fact that everybody is going after the buck,” he said. “College administrators preach the high road, and then they stuff the cash in all four pockets.

“Jackie Sherrill told me this a couple years ago, ‘Billy, the culprit is ESPN. They toss the money around and, then, of course, the colleges go after it.’

“I don’t think it’s good for college football, and I don’t know how they fix it.”

Yet his love for the games and the job overrides those concerns. He said he’ll keep turning on his microphone until it’s no longer fun.

“Every game,” Hillgrove said, “it’s a magic carpet ride.”

Jerry DiPaola is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Jerry by email at jdipaola@triblive.com or via Twitter .



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Conductor Anthony Parnther on the importance of diversity …

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Parnther will make his BBC Proms debut on Friday night at the Royal Albert Hall when he conducts the Chineke! Orchestra, Europe’s first majority black and ethnically diverse orchestral group.

The group will perform a number of classical pieces on the night including Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony, Haydn’s Trumpet Concerto and Samuel Coleridge-Taylor’s Four Noveletten.

BBC Proms
The BBC Proms at London’s Royal Albert Hall (Mark Allan/BBC/PA)

Speaking on the importance of representation, he told the PA news agency: “It’s so important for young people to see themselves in spaces where they might not expect to see themselves because then they’ll know and can focus on what is possible.

“Where you could be one day, where you could work or you could create. So I am a firm believer of this level of visibility.”

Parnther admitted that he had “very few people to look up to” within the classical music world growing up.

He said: “I grew up in the United States and that’s where the majority of my career has been. But it has not been uncommon throughout my professional career that I’ve been the only person of an underrepresented community in the room.

“So when I come in and most of the orchestra looks just like I do, I feel at home. It’s very special.”

Anthony Parnther
Anthony Parnther (Konstantin Golovchinsky/PA)

He recalled that the first black conductor he ever saw was archival footage of James DePreist when he was conducting the New York Philharmonic, and the second being the late Michael Morgan.

After Morgan’s death in 2021, Parnther took over the mantle of leading the Gateways Music Festival, which is an all-black orchestral festival that meets every year.

Reflecting on what more he thinks could be done to improve diversity within classical music, he said: “There’s a couple of things. We need more resources available to more widespread communities at large.

“And we’ve got to actively go into various communities and provide the resources in order to participate in classical music, which is not inexpensive.

“To buy an instrument is expensive, to have lessons is costly, to be able to afford and go to the right schools and mentor with the right teachers and go to the right festivals is all costly.

“So the first thing is resources. And then within the industry, if the industry is serious about change, then they will have to actively recruit diverse talent, which may mean a fundamental restructuring of how orchestras recruit and audition and retain their members.”

Oppenheimer
Cast of Oppenheimer (Ian West/PA)

Throughout his career, Parnther has held many notable positions including the music director and conductor of the San Bernardino Symphony Orchestra and the Southeast Symphony & Chorus, both in Los Angeles.

He has also led the Hollywood Studio Symphony in numerous featured films and television series, recently conducting the score for Oppenheimer and previously working on blockbusters such as Encanto, Black Panther and Ghostbusters.

Parnther has also collaborated with musical stars including Kanye West, Snoop Dogg and Rihanna.

The BBC Proms will be Parnther’s next challenge, which he said he is “really looking forward to”.

“It’s a mixture of emotions. There’s a there’s a lot of excitement, a small bit of terror that goes on with a concert that has this level of visibility”, he added.

“But this orchestra is one that has become a second family to me over the last five or six years since I first had the opportunity to conduct them. So this is a pivotal moment for all of us.”

Anthony Parnther conducts Chineke! at Prom 61, on September 1 at London’s Royal Albert Hall, and broadcast live on BBC Four and BBC Radio 3.



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Conductor Anthony Parnther on the importance of

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Parnther will make his BBC Proms debut on Friday night at the Royal Albert Hall when he conducts the Chineke! Orchestra, Europe’s first majority black and ethnically diverse orchestral group.

The group will perform a number of classical pieces on the night including Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony, Haydn’s Trumpet Concerto and Samuel Coleridge-Taylor’s Four Noveletten.

BBC Proms
The BBC Proms at London’s Royal Albert Hall (Mark Allan/BBC/PA)

Speaking on the importance of representation, he told the PA news agency: “It’s so important for young people to see themselves in spaces where they might not expect to see themselves because then they’ll know and can focus on what is possible.

“Where you could be one day, where you could work or you could create. So I am a firm believer of this level of visibility.”

Parnther admitted that he had “very few people to look up to” within the classical music world growing up.

He said: “I grew up in the United States and that’s where the majority of my career has been. But it has not been uncommon throughout my professional career that I’ve been the only person of an underrepresented community in the room.

“So when I come in and most of the orchestra looks just like I do, I feel at home. It’s very special.”

Anthony Parnther
Anthony Parnther (Konstantin Golovchinsky/PA)

He recalled that the first black conductor he ever saw was archival footage of James DePreist when he was conducting the New York Philharmonic, and the second being the late Michael Morgan.

After Morgan’s death in 2021, Parnther took over the mantle of leading the Gateways Music Festival, which is an all-black orchestral festival that meets every year.

Reflecting on what more he thinks could be done to improve diversity within classical music, he said: “There’s a couple of things. We need more resources available to more widespread communities at large.

“And we’ve got to actively go into various communities and provide the resources in order to participate in classical music, which is not inexpensive.

“To buy an instrument is expensive, to have lessons is costly, to be able to afford and go to the right schools and mentor with the right teachers and go to the right festivals is all costly.

“So the first thing is resources. And then within the industry, if the industry is serious about change, then they will have to actively recruit diverse talent, which may mean a fundamental restructuring of how orchestras recruit and audition and retain their members.”

Oppenheimer
Cast of Oppenheimer (Ian West/PA)

Throughout his career, Parnther has held many notable positions including the music director and conductor of the San Bernardino Symphony Orchestra and the Southeast Symphony & Chorus, both in Los Angeles.

He has also led the Hollywood Studio Symphony in numerous featured films and television series, recently conducting the score for Oppenheimer and previously working on blockbusters such as Encanto, Black Panther and Ghostbusters.

Parnther has also collaborated with musical stars including Kanye West, Snoop Dogg and Rihanna.

The BBC Proms will be Parnther’s next challenge, which he said he is “really looking forward to”.

“It’s a mixture of emotions. There’s a there’s a lot of excitement, a small bit of terror that goes on with a concert that has this level of visibility”, he added.

“But this orchestra is one that has become a second family to me over the last five or six years since I first had the opportunity to conduct them. So this is a pivotal moment for all of us.”

Anthony Parnther conducts Chineke! at Prom 61, on September 1 at London’s Royal Albert Hall, and broadcast live on BBC Four and BBC Radio 3.



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Music, Memory, an Old Flame, and Alzheimer’s – “A Good Day”, a New Musical to be Presented by Shawnee Playhouse – Music Industry Today

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Scene set for 81st Royal Meath Agricultural Show in Trim

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The sheep section at the 2022 Royal Meath Agricultural Show Photos: Seamus Farrelly.

It is that time of year, with the evenings closing in, and the last of the agricultural shows are taking place around the country. This means that it is time to be heading to Trim on the first Sunday in September for the 81st Royal Meath Show. Over the next few days, the Porchfields on the banks of the Boyne will be transforming from a quiet riverwalk haven to a buzzing show field.

One of the biggest attractions on the day will be the music, so even if you know nothing else about what goes on in the field, you can be guaranteed a great time dancing with local legend Matt Leavy at 1pm, and the national star Johnny Brady rocking the field at 3pm. There will be a dance floor on the field, so don’t be shy and put on those dancing shoes and let the hair down for a few hours.

No matter what your interest is there will be something to keep you busy for the day, with cattle, sheep, goats, horses, poultry or home industries, reflecting the talent and skill of people around the country.

This year the cattle section is hosting two large sections, with the finals of the North Eastern Limousin Club Championship and the North Eastern Simmental Calf Championship both being held. The cattle section is always a huge display of livestock, no matter how big or small the animal. There is a great display of all breeds from the red of the Herefords to the black of the Aberdeen Angus, with several other breeds in the middle. One of the highlights for many show supporters are the young handler classes that take place. When you see a youngster leading a spruced-up calf walking around a show ring, it would make any parent proud, and gives hope for the future of farming.

In the same field as the cattle, there is competition from all the different breeds of sheep. From the black noses of the Suffolks to the fluffy Hampshire Downs, everyone’s favourites will be clipped and polished to the last. Again, in the sheep section the youth will be out in force with their pet lambs. But just to make sure that the crowd is kept around the ring for a while longer, they go one step further with a fancy-dress lamb. The children really get into the spirit of this with the work of dressing up themselves and their lamb.

In the corner of the of this field, some might say hidden away, you will find the hidden gem of the goat section. From the smallest Pygmy goat, the cutest of all the breeds to the large farm goats, a great display will always be found here. The exhibitors are always willing to give tips and advice, but a good fence is a must.

The horse section always brings a large crowd of exhibitors and followers. Here the youngest riding could be three years old, being led around on their small ponies. With the traditions of going to the local shows starting at this age, it’s a full family outing, where older members could be taking part in the working hunter classes or showing classes as well. A big area of interest in this county is always racing, a special area that takes part is the “racehorse to riding horse”, where all the best racehorses can take part.

The dog show is always a great attraction. There is no need to leave the fur baby at home on the day, they might even go home with a prize. The entries for the dog show are taken on the day, so don’t worry, you’re not late yet. There are numerous different classes to be entered, from breed specific to young handlers. More details of the classes are on Royal Meath dog show on Facebook or www.royalmeathshow.ie.

You might hear yodelling coming from the Home Industries tent on the day as the guilds from Meath ICA battle it out to see who has the best displays for ‘My Favourite Things’, the iconic song from ‘The Sound of Music’. The displays will include art, floral arrangements, cakes and crafts and are a fantastic display. The smell of baking is strong here as well, as the bakers of the country battle it out. The green fingers will be busy for the last few weeks, minding and pruning the garden to get the best of produce for tent. All the young artists get the paints and glue out for the day as well, with displays of buns, wellingtons, wooden spoons and many other magnificent projects.

Lorraine from Daisy Cottage Farm will be in the artisan tents, with cookery demonstrations. Local suppliers will be tempting you with their tasty products. This is a great area for a wander through as you may not be aware of the talent and range of goods that are available locally. The second tent here focuses more on the crafts of the area, and you could end up with something unexpected going home.

There is plenty more to be seen on the field from the vintage display by the South Meath Vintage group, to numerous trade stands with all sorts and ranges of things to tempt you with, while there will be plenty of coffee, ice cream, meals and all sorts of treats to keep you going.

The show kicks off from 9am on the Sunday morning. We ask that you cooperate with those on the roads and gates to keep the area safe and hassle free for all.

The committee are always very grateful for the time, sponsorship and support that it receives form all. Its hard to express how far this help goes to running the show each year. People are very generous and without help in any form it would be impossible to run the show. If you would like more details on any area, the committee are always willing to help. The secretary can be contacted on (086) 735 5557, email royalmeathshow@gmail.com, or on their Facebook page Royal Meath Show.



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‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider Verse’ hip-hop soundtrack come…

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Step aside, John Williams. There’s a new type of soundtrack in the orchestra pit.

Along with the Oscar-winning animated superhero film “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” arrived Daniel Pemberton’s soundtrack lush with the sounds of hip-hop, featuring Jaden Smith, Nicki Minaj, Lil Wayne, Post Malone, Ty Dolla Sign, Juice Wrld and others.

“Metro Boomin is its executive producer, doing for the Spider-Verse what Kendrick Lamar did for ‘Black Panther’ and ‘Wakanda’ back in 2018. Fresh off the success of his recently platinum-certified 2022 comeback album ‘Heroes & Villains,’ Metro takes a serviceable stab at crafting music to swing to,” wrote Dylan Green this year for Pitchfork, an online music publication.


10 weekend things around Colorado Springs and beyond: Butterfly Grand Reveal, Fountain Parade, Vintage Baseball, Victor Plein Air, Trinidad Rodeo,

And now comes “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Live in Concert,” a screening of the 2018 film that plays in HD on a large screen above and behind a live orchestra performing the score. It’s Tuesday at Pikes Peak Center.

“You can see strings, horns, percussion, timpani,” said the show’s producer, Ollie Rosenblatt. “It’s a rhythmical score. There’s also a live scratch DJ on stage performing the hip-hop. It’s a mix of classical Western music meets hip-hop, drumming and percussion with break beats and electronics.”

If that sounds like quite a mash-up of musical genres, you’re right, it is. Doing this particular movie with its hip-hop soundtrack in this format isn’t an obvious choice due to the complexity of the music.

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“There’s a huge amount of different styles of music,” Rosenblatt said. “It’s not a classical sound like John Williams’ straight orchestral. But there’s an incredible dynamism and energy in the film and we wanted to bring that to life. The music reflects that. It amplifies the film.”

In the animated film, Brooklyn Afro-Latinx teen Miles Morales is bitten by a radioactive spider in the subway and gains mysterious powers. Other spider heroes from parallel universes descend to help the teen master his new powers and save the city from a villain bent on destroying it.

The film is notable as the first animated addition to the Spider-Man movie franchise, while the national touring concert tour is notable for its female conductor, Emily Marshall, and female orchestra, The Broadway Sinfonietta, a group made up primarily of women of color.

“You engage in the film in a different way when you hear the music live,” Rosenblatt said. “The emotional power and pull of the film is even greater.”

Contact the writer: 636-0270

Contact the writer: 636-0270

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Classical Indian music series in Mt. Tremper features virt…

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Open your ears to new sounds at an upcoming series of traditional Indian music performances at Matagiri Sri Aurobindo Center, the self-proclaimed “Center for the Evolution of Consciousness.” The serene woods of Mt. Tremper are the perfect environment in this pursuit. 

Classical Indian music is known for its exotic (to Westerners) stringed instruments and percussion, microtonal scales, drones, and dynamics ranging from trance-inducing and meditative to excitingly energetic.

On Sun., Sep. 3 from 4-6pm, Vinay Desai will perform on the santoor, an trapezoidal dulcimer that requires great finesse. His lifetime of studying the instrument deposited him in Walden, NY – the uninitiated would be surprised to learn just how much of a hotspot for traditional Indian music the Hudson Valley is. Vinay will be accompanied by tabla virtuoso Unmesh Banerjee. Tickets are $20-$30.

Wed, Sep. 13, Ritesh and Rajnish Mishra present “A Family’s Journey in Music” at 7pm. This will be less a concert and more “an informal educational exchange with time for questions”. The family in question grew up surrounded by masters of North Indian classical music, and have performed all over the world, from Albert Hall in London to Lincoln Center in New York. Tickets are $15-$50.

Then on Sun., Oct. 4 at noon, santoor maestro Tarun Bhattacharya will lead an all-star cast of friends and performers in a self-contained world music festival lasting until 4pm. 

Visit matagiri.org for tickets and more information.



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